USPS Lifts Lithium Battery Ban

November 14, 2012 | Kate Horrell

Whoohoo!  In the best news of the holiday shopping season, the United States Postal Service (USPS) has lifted the ban on mailing electronics with lithium batteries to overseas locations.  In a quiet announcement made on 9 November 2012, the USPS stated that,

Effective Nov.15, Post Offices will begin accepting packages containing lithium batteries installed in electronic devices bound for many international destinations, and Army (APO), Fleet (FPO) and Diplomatic Post Office (DPO) locations.

The ban on mailing items with lithium batteries started on 16 May 2o12.  It has been an inconvenience and additional expensive for military families living overseas, who have had to use alternative means for purchases and repairs of electronic devices.  The USPS had originally said that they hoped to have the ban lifted by early 2013.  The earlier lifting of the ban will help holiday shoppers and gift givers save both time and money while sourcing the items they wish to purchase.

Comments

  1. Shari says:

    Oh, sweet! My husband is going to be *thrilled*!!! Thanks for the heads up. :-)

  2. Nunta says:

    this really does not help. you cant buy a new item for APO shiipping and ask Amazon to "install the batteries for you"

  3. Richard says:

    Are you stupid? It implies items with lithium batteries contained within them, such as laptops, consoles, cell phones which have the battery built in like iphones, ipads etc. It's not saying if they aren't in the compartment they wont take it

  4. Tre says:

    @richard You might want to cut back on the "stupid" remarks until you actually understand what you're talking about. Nunta's comment is spot on. The battery must be INSIDE the equipment that is being shipped. Not in the box on its own or shipped separately (http://about.usps.com/postal-bulletin/2012/pb22350/html/updt_002.htm). Trust me I've been dealing with this for a while. ShipItAPO actually offers a service to install the battery inside the equipment to make it compliant. To Nunta's point, most sellers such as Amazon will not ship to overseas address because of this requirement. Now, people get past this all the time and still get packages through the postal service on their own. But, Nunta’s point is still valid.