DOD Child Care Fees Changing

The Department of Defense announced yesterday that it is changing its fee schedule for child care in DOD facilities. Fees have not be raised in six years and obviously, costs have been rising. The primary change is the addition of three new levels at the top of the pay scale, raising costs for high income families. These changes will take effect on September 30, 2010.

The new scale is:

– Category I – incomes of $29,400 or below – will pay between $44-$59 per week;

– Category II – incomes from $29,401 to $35,700 – will pay between $60-$74 per week;

– Category III – incomes from $35,701 to $46,200 – will pay between $75-$90 per week;

– Category IV – incomes from $46,201 to $57,750 – will pay between $91-$105 per week;

– Category V – incomes from $57,751 to $73,500 – will pay between $106-$121 per week;

– Category VI – incomes from $73,501 to $85,000 – will pay between $122-$130 per week;

– Category VII – incomes from $85,001 to $100,000 – will pay between $131-$133 per week;

– Category VIII – incomes from $100,001 to $125,000 – will pay between $134-$136 per week;

– Category IX – incomes of $125,001 or above – will pay between $137-$139 per week.

More information may be found at the Defense.gov press release.

About the Author

Kate Horrell
Kate Horrell is a military financial coach, mom of four teens, and Navy spouse. She has a background in taxes and mortgage banking, and a trove of experience helping other military families with their money. Follow her on twitter @realKateHorrell.
  • julie

    what are most military parents’ reactions to this increase?

    • Mo6

      How many legal dependants does both the General and the E3 have. Generals USUALLY don’t have to worry about child costs due to the average age of his/her children by the time they make rank…However I get the point of the drastic income difference between the two. The comparisons should be kept between the people who actually use the facilities and all the factors that are relevant to the cost, income and affordability. The military is not doing anyone any favors…they price gouge like every one else. Just another way to get more money back–by overcharging those that make more!

  • Caitlin

    Seriously? I think it makes perfect sense. Military childcare is top notch (I say that after several years working off post child care and then bringing my son to on post daycare) and we have to recognize that it does cost alot to provide that service. For the most part, their fees are very reasonable, even considering the top income. For example, good daycare in my area (I live in a lower cost area than most of America) is more than 200/week. So, still higher than the most the service ever charges a soldier. I am happy that the military is giving their members the opportunity to give their children the best care at a cost everyone can afford. It’s just one more benefit the service can offer to ALL its members, not just those who have managed to make the top income bracket. People just need to accept that on some level, child care is still another amenity offered to members so they have to make it accessible to everyone. Charging an E3 the same as a general or so would just be ridiculous. I’m glad the military considered that when setting their child care cost.

    • Mo6

      How many legal dependants does both the General and the E3 have. Generals USUALLY don’t have to worry about child costs due to the average age of his/her children by the time they make rank…However I get the point of the drastic income difference between the two. The comparisons should be kept between the people who actually use the facilities and all the factors that are relevant to the cost, income and affordability. The military is not doing anyone any favors…they price gouge like every one else. Just another way to get more money back–by overcharging those that make more!

  • Mo6

    If the military wants to join the “ranks” of the 21st century they would find a way to incorporate not only the pay scale but the family size into the child care fees. Currently, a family with 1 or 2 children pay the same category fees as a family with 4, 5 or 6 children and while that is the personal choice of each family it does reflect the morale and welfare of the family who cannot afford the childcare because the are budgeting based on priority. For instance, my 4 yo preschooler will have to forego an opportunity socialize and normalize with his peers in a typical classroom setting because he is part of a family of six children and regardless, we are in Cat 6 and have expenses related to our other children as well. At least, non-military schools take into account family size and the costs are deviated for larger family sizes. By the way, military childcare is ok at best!